Seminar tips

  1. What makes for a successful paper and seminar? Don Davis http://www.columbia.edu/~drd28/SuccessfulPaperSeminar.pdf

  2. Writing Tips for PhD Students (see the part on seminars), John Cochrane https://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/john.cochrane/teaching/papers/phd_paper_writing.pdf

  3. How to Give an Applied Micro Talk, Jesse Shapiro https://www.brown.edu/Research/Shapiro/pdfs/applied_micro_slides.pdf

  4. Public Speaking for Academic Economists, Rachael Meager http://www.princeton.edu/~reddings/tradephd/public_speaking_for_academic_economists.pdf

  5. 22 Tips for Conference and Seminar Presentations, Marc Bellemare https://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/10053

  6. LSE PhD Seminar Guidelines http://personal.lse.ac.uk/fischerg/Assets/EC501PresentationGuidelines.pdf  

  7. On seminars, Bruce Hansen https://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~bhansen/placement/seminar.pdf

  8. How to give a lunch talk, Adam Guren http://people.bu.edu/guren/Guren_HowToGiveALunchTalk.pdf

  9. On slides, Bruce Hansen https://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~bhansen/placement/Seminar%20Slides.pdf

  10. Beamer tips, Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham https://paulgp.github.io/beamer_tips.pdf

  11. Better Presentations, Jonathan Schwabish https://policyviz.com/better-presentations/

Discussant tips

  1.  The Discussant’s Art, Chris Blattman https://chrisblattman.com/2010/02/22/the-discussants-art/

  2. How to critique, Macartan Humphreys http://www.macartan.nyc/teaching/discuss/

  3. Guidelines for Referee Reports, Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet https://are.berkeley.edu/courses/ARE251/2004/assignments/RRGuidelines.pdf

Refereeing tips (discussant tips are also relevant here)

  1. How to Write an Effective Referee Report and Improve the Scientific Review Process https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.31.1.231

  2. A checklist manifesto for peer review, Brendan Nyhan https://thepoliticalmethodologist.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/tpm_v23_n1.pdf

  3. How much to referee and how to do it, David McKenzie http://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/how-much-to-referee-and-how-to-do-it

  4. Read bad papers, Marc Bellemare http://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/13274

  5. 20 Rules for Refereeing, Marc Bellemare http://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/5542

  6. On commenting on others’ writing, David Eil https://twitter.com/economistified/status/934912949927411712

On figures for presentations and papers

  1. Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham has put together a helpful collection of nice figures you may draw inspiration from: https://paulgp.github.io/best_figures.html

  2. An Economist’s Guide to Visualizing Data, Jonathan Schwabish https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.28.1.209

  3. The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, Edwards Tufte https://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/books_vdqi

  4. Fundamentals of Data Visualization, Claus Wilke https://serialmentor.com/dataviz/

  5. Data Visualization: A Practical Introduction, Kieran Healy https://kieranhealy.org/publications/dataviz/

On writing your PhD papers

  1. If you are anything like me, read “Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule” (ht: Jonathan Dingel for this piece, via his own page) and quarantine your writing and coding time. Allow for deep dives. Schedule meetings and busywork at your least productive time http://paulgraham.com/makersschedule.html

  2. Ten Rules, Claudia Goldin and Larry Katz http://economics.harvard.edu/files/economics/files/tenruleswriting.pdf

  3. Writing Tips for PhD Students, John Cochrane https://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/john.cochrane/teaching/papers/phd_paper_writing.pdf

  4. The Determinants of… How Not to Do Social Science, Marc Bellemare https://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/10484

  5. Steve Redding’s page for trade PhD students is great. Take special note of the field-specific topics, methods, and overall look of top job market papers in your field over time in order to calibrate your expectations. http://www.princeton.edu/~reddings/TradePhd.htm The evolution of the NBER Summer Institute topics in your field are also helpful in this regard; you want to be working on the “next” thing.

  6. Ten Commandments for Regression Tables, Keith Head http://blogs.ubc.ca/khead/research/research-advice/regression-tables

  7. How to write, Macartan Humphreys http://www.macartan.nyc/teaching/on-writing/

  8. On writing, David Eil https://twitter.com/economistified/status/895708590329126912

  9. Cite Intelligently, Marc Bellemare http://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/12639

  10. Introduction formula, Keith Head http://blogs.ubc.ca/khead/research/research-advice/formula

  11. Conclusion formula, Marc Bellemare https://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/12060

  12. Middle bits, Marc Bellemare https://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/12797

On publishing

  1. Practical Tips for Writing and Publishing Applied Economics Papers, Beatty and Shimshack https://static1.squarespace.com/static/55e8ab64e4b0b55649c4ab64/t/59d73b99f43b5586a0484a22/1507277732282/beatty_shimshack_applied_econ_papers.pdf

  2. How to Publish in Academic Journals, Marc Bellemare https://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/BellemareAAEAEarlyCareerWorkshop.pdf (2017) http://marcfbellemare.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/BellemareHowtoPublish.pdf (2014)

  3. Interview with QJE editors http://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/qa-with-larry-katz-editor-of-qje

  4. Interview with 2012 WBER editors http://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/a-qa-with-the-editors-of-the-wber-alain-de-janvry-and-elisabeth-sadoulet

Getting started on empirical work

  1. Code and Data for the Social Sciences, Gentzkow and Shapiro http://web.stanford.edu/~gentzkow/research/CodeAndData.pdf

  2. Good enough practices in scientific computing https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005510

  3. Stata Cheat Sheets https://www.stata.com/bookstore/stata-cheat-sheets/

  4. Programming with Stata https://www.povertyactionlab.org/sites/default/files/resources/IAPStataWorkshopSlides.pdf

  5. GIS Analysis for Applied Economists, Melissa Dell https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/dell/files/090110combined_gis_notes.pdf

  6. GIS for economists, Masayuki Kudamatu https://sites.google.com/site/mkudamatsu/gis

  7. The Analysis of Household Surveys, Angus Deaton http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/593871468777303124/The-Analysis-of-Household-Surveys-A-Microeconometric-Approach-to-Development-Policy

  8. Curated measurement and survey topics, Development Impact Blog https://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/curated-list-our-postings-measurement-and-survey-design

  9. The Mixtape, Scott Cunningham https://scunning.com/mixtape.html (best introduction to causal inference)

  10. Curated methods links, Development Impact Blog https://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/curated-list-our-postings-technical-topics-your-one-stop-shop-methodology

  11. EGAP Methods Guides http://egap.org/list-methods-guides (handy set of tips on a range of applied topics)

  12. R for Data Science, Hadley Wickham https://r4ds.had.co.nz/ (best introduction to R, if you really must)